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19 Comments

  1. Martin Murray
    January 22, 2016 @ 9:57 pm

    Beautiful images!

    Reply

    • Andy Mumford
      January 30, 2016 @ 7:29 pm

      Thanks Martin

      Reply

  2. Landscapes with the X Series | Fuji-X Photograp...
    January 25, 2016 @ 1:37 pm

    […] Back when I first switched to Fuji around 6 months ago I was already pretty convinced that the X Series cameras would be ideal for travel because of their size and weight but at the time I wasn’t totally sure that I would be able to use them as my…  […]

    Reply

  3. Landscapes with the X Series | Andy Mumford
    January 28, 2016 @ 9:07 am

    […] Sourced through Scoop.it from: https://www.fujixpassion.com […]

    Reply

  4. Landscapes with the X Series – FUJI X PAS...
    January 28, 2016 @ 9:47 am

    […] I’d been using a Nikon D800E for a number of years and wasn’t sure whether the X System was really designed with landscape photographers in mind. In my last blog (HERE) I tested the image quality of the X-T10 with the 10-24mm and 55-200mm zooms against my Nikon and found that while there is obviously a resolution difference, the difference in detail and quality was negligible.  […]

    Reply

  5. Landscapes with the X Series | Andy Mumford | P...
    January 28, 2016 @ 4:51 pm

    […]   […]

    Reply

  6. Barry V
    January 29, 2016 @ 2:59 am

    Great images. I would like to know a couple of things, why are you using f16 and greater when diffraction sets in after f11 and f11 gives great DOF with the 10-24 lens. I would also be interested in an article regarding your Lightroom workflow and settings as well as your method of sharpening for the web. The images have a great sharpness about them without looking over sharpened.

    Reply

    • Andy Mumford
      January 30, 2016 @ 7:47 pm

      Hi Barry
      I’d have to recheck the files but I suspect the shots that are done at f16 or above are longer exposures where I’ve been trying to make the exposure longer in conjunction with using a filter to create get a particular shutter time. Generally I shoot landscapes around f11 unless a desired shutter time dictates that I have to close the aperture down more.

      As for my post processing workflow, I’m thinking of doing a blog on it at some point, but most of what I do has been picked up from other photographers here and there and then mixed in with my own workflow. I do almost nothing in Lightroom, just White Balance adjustments and lens calibration stuff. The majority of my workflow is in Photoshop using something called Luminosity Masks, which were pioneered by a guy called Tony Kuyper. He has an astonishing amount of information and free tutorials on his website. http://goodlight.us/writing/tutorials.html
      I basically just play around with levels adjustments only in the midtones using luminosity masks that select only the midtones. I’ll then pull in the highlights with a luminosity mask that selects only highlights, and then do some dodging and burning. I also occasionally use Nik Color Efex Pro to re-adjust white balance and vibrance.
      There are other ways of doing similar things, for example Nik Color Efex Pro has a nice way of selecting particular tones and areas of a photo, but I’ve got used to Luminosity Masks and find the control and effect I can get with just a few simple adjustments really suits the look I want to achieve with my landscape photos.

      For web sharpening I use an Action from the same photography, Tony Kuyper, which works along a principle that an image is reduced in size to 1.66x it’s final output size and then slightly over sharpened. Then the image is resized to it’s final output size and all the artefacts disappear, leaving the image looking crisp. I’m over simplifying quite a bit here, so it’s worth having a look at his tutorials although there’s a lot to take in.

      At some point in the future I’ll get round to pulling all the different things together and writing them up in a blog.

      Reply

      • Barry V
        April 11, 2020 @ 2:51 am

        Hi Andy
        Thanks for your detailed reply. I’m actually using Tony’s V4 panel in Photoshop now and have been using Luminosity Masks for some time with Lights, Darks and Midtone actions I created myself from Tony’s info but in the end bit the bullet and bought the panel. I’ve used the sharpening as you described from the panel but at the default of 50% opacity thought them to be slightly oversharpened. I develop my RAF’s in Capture One and like you do most of the heavy lifting in Photoshop. Looking at the images again maybe the look you have has more to do with the micro contrast rather than the sharpness it’s almost 3D …….. whatever it is they look brilliant!

        Their is a very steep learning curve to the Luminosity Masks so I am looking forward to your future posts on the subject. I very much enjoy a blog such as this with varied contributors, keeps things interesting.

        Barry

        http://bjustice.zenfolio.com/

        Reply

      • Barry V
        April 11, 2020 @ 2:51 am

        Hi Andy

        Thanks for your detailed reply. I’m actually using Tony’s V4 panel in Photoshop now and have been using Luminosity Masks for some time with Lights, Darks and Midtone actions I created myself from Tony’s info but in the end bit the bullet and bought the panel. I’ve used the sharpening as you described from the panel but at the default of 50% opacity thought them to be slightly oversharpened. I develop my RAF’s in Capture One and like you do most of the heavy lifting in Photoshop. Looking at the images again maybe the look you have has more to do with the micro contrast rather than the sharpness it’s almost 3D …….. whatever it is they look brilliant!

        Their is a very steep learning curve to the Luminosity Masks so I am looking forward to your future posts on the subject. I very much enjoy a blog such as this with varied contributors, keeps things interesting.

        Barry

        http://bjustice.zenfolio.com/

        Reply

      • Barry V
        January 31, 2016 @ 4:26 pm

        Hi Andy
        Thanks for your detailed reply. I’m actually using Tony’s V4 panel in Photoshop now and have been using Luminosity Masks for some time with Lights, Darks and Midtone actions I created myself from Tony’s info but in the end bit the bullet and bought the panel. I’ve used the sharpening as you described from the panel but at the default of 50% opacity thought them to be slightly oversharpened. I develop my RAF’s in Capture One and like you do most of the heavy lifting in Photoshop. Looking at the images again maybe the look you have has more to do with the micro contrast rather than the sharpness it’s almost 3D …….. whatever it is they look brilliant!
        Their is a very steep learning curve to the Luminosity Masks so I am looking forward to your future posts on the subject. I very much enjoy a blog such as this with varied contributors, keeps things interesting.
        Barry
        http://bjustice.zenfolio.com/

        Reply

  7. Mark Devereux
    January 29, 2016 @ 3:39 am

    Really outstanding work – thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    • Andy Mumford
      January 30, 2016 @ 7:29 pm

      Thanks so much Mark

      Reply

  8. Landscapes with the X Series | Andy Mumford | F...
    January 29, 2016 @ 9:20 am

    […] Back when I first switched to Fuji around 6 months ago I was already pretty convinced that the X Series cameras would be ideal for travel because of their size and weight but at the time I wasn’t totally sure that I would be able to use them as my first choice landscape camera.I’d been using a Nikon D800E for a number of years and wasn’t sure whether the X System was really designed with landscape photographers in mind. In my last blog (HERE) I tested the image quality of the X-T10 with the 10-24mm and 55-200mm zooms against my Nikon and found that while there is obviously a resolution difference, the difference in detail and quality was negligible.Since then I’ve used both the X-T1 and X-T10 extensively for landscapes both at home in Portugal and while travelling around Indonesia for a month last summer. My first landscape shoot with the X-T10 was when I led a workshop for a sunrise shoot at Lisbon’s iconic Vasco da Gama bridge. I was impressed by how intuitive it was to use and……  […]

    Reply

  9. Landscapes with the X Series | Andy Mumford | P...
    January 29, 2016 @ 11:33 am

    […] Back when I first switched to Fuji around 6 months ago I was already pretty convinced that the X Series cameras would be ideal for travel because of their size and weight but at the time I wasn’t totally sure that I would be able to use them as my first choice landscape camera.I’d been using a Nikon D800E for a number of years and wasn’t sure whether the X System was really designed with landscape photographers in mind. In my last blog (HERE) I tested the image quality of the X-T10 with the 10-24mm and 55-200mm zooms against my Nikon and found that while there is obviously a resolution difference, the difference in detail and quality was negligible.Since then I’ve used both the X-T1 and X-T10 extensively for landscapes both at home in Portugal and while travelling around Indonesia for a month last summer. My first landscape shoot with the X-T10 was when I led a workshop for a sunrise shoot at Lisbon’s iconic Vasco da Gama bridge. I was impressed by how intuitive it was to use and……  […]

    Reply

  10. Landscapes with the X Series | Andy Mumford | M...
    January 30, 2016 @ 10:18 pm

    […] Back when I first switched to Fuji around 6 months ago I was already pretty convinced that the X Series cameras would be ideal for travel because of their size and weight but at the time I wasn’t totally sure that I would be able to use them as my first choice landscape camera.I’d been using a Nikon D800E for a number of years and wasn’t sure whether the X System was really designed with landscape photographers in mind. In my last blog (HERE) I tested the image quality of the X-T10 with the 10-24mm and 55-200mm zooms against my Nikon and found that while there is obviously a resolution difference, the difference in detail and quality was negligible.Since then I’ve used both the X-T1 and X-T10 extensively for landscapes both at home in Portugal and while travelling around Indonesia for a month last summer. My first landscape shoot with the X-T10 was when I led a workshop for a sunrise shoot at Lisbon’s iconic Vasco da Gama bridge. I was impressed by how intuitive it was to use and……  […]

    Reply

  11. Landscapes with the X Series – FUJI X PAS...
    February 2, 2016 @ 7:34 pm

    […]   […]

    Reply

  12. Jake Hall
    September 1, 2016 @ 5:32 am

    I may be a little late to the party here (better late than never i suppose) but which filter kit/size did you use on the fuji 10-24?

    Reply

    • Andy Mumford
      September 11, 2016 @ 12:02 pm

      Hi Jake
      I use Lee 100mm filters on the 10-24mm. I’d love to be able to use the smaller Lee Seven5, but they cause vignette below about 14mm. The filter ring on the lens is 72mm and the Seven5 system is only 3mm wider than that, so you can imagine that it’s possible to see the edges of the filter holder in the corners of the frame when your shooting really wide.

      Reply

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