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11 Comments

  1. Brandon Price
    April 26, 2016 @ 7:24 pm

    A great article, and the photos are beautiful!

    Reply

  2. Amer Kapetanović
    April 26, 2016 @ 11:52 pm

    Nice article and I do agree with most of it. Thank you for writing and sharing. However, I’d like to add one more perspective here: My X-T1 failed in January. Got it back from repair by March 13. 350 USD for repairing lcd display flat cable (mainboard as well) and 6 weeks turnaround. When I got it back, the same day my 90mm f2.0 failed. Aperture was stuck somewhere at 5.6 and not moving at all. Last week X-T1 just died in the middle of the shoot (it seems like the shutter died, it is stuck while covering the sensor). 90mm has not yet arrived and I am sending X-T1 to the service again. Please do not get me wrong here – I absolutely LOVE working with X-T1, especially X-lenses (I own 23 1.4, 27 2.8, 56 1.2 & 90 f2.0) but, honestly, it proved to be unreliable and the service turnaround time is just ridiculous. For a professional photographer camera and lenses reliability and having short service turnaround time as short as possible is imperative.
    I also shot weddings using X-T1 & X100 combo but my recent X-T1 failures make me reluctant to do so ever again. I like Fuji images far more than Nikon/Canon but there is much more to pro photography than that.

    Reply

    • Bradley Hanson
      April 27, 2016 @ 12:17 am

      Sorry to hear. I have had a very different experience with my X-Pro1 bodies. I do agree that Fujifilm needs an FPS service like Nikon and Canon, but I think that is in the works.

      Reply

  3. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Bradley Hanson
    April 27, 2016 @ 11:00 am

    […] Sourced through Scoop.it from: https://www.fujixpassion.com […]

    Reply

  4. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Fujifilm X Cameras...
    April 27, 2016 @ 4:30 pm

    […] A BRIEF PREFACE: I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook …  […]

    Reply

  5. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Fujifilm X Series ...
    April 27, 2016 @ 8:06 pm

    […] A BRIEF PREFACE: I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook …  […]

    Reply

  6. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Fuji X files | Sc...
    April 28, 2016 @ 6:38 am

    […] I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook photographer and developed my own film for my high school newspaper and wrote record reviews. It was only interesting to me, so I’ll skip the details. This is an article about equipment, but I take the same photographs, regardless of the camera. Hasselblad, Leica, iPhone, Holga. I will think about composition differently in it’s a square format or a panoramic format, but I’m always me. The photographer makes the photograph. Photographers should let go of fetishizing the tools used and redirect that energy into the final image. When digital started taking over around 2003, I used to be obsessed with shooting film and considered digital to be an affront to that. What I realized in time is that shooting film gave me a solid foundation in understanding exposure, printing and composition, as well as shooting efficiently. These are things that I take with me in my current life shooting digitally, but the medium from which the final image is created is WAY down on the list of importance. Focusing on equipment is yet another form of materialism and another form of collector mentality. I wish I could get back all the time in my life I wasted looking at pointless photos of wine bottles comparing bokeh and sharpness, reading reviews. Reading specification data is never going to be fulfilling. One will never have the perfect camera because no such camera exists. The perfect camera is in your mind. Master your craft and you’ll realize that there are really only two kinds of cameras: those make it easier to get to your desired image, and those that make it harder. In 20 years, all that will remain is the final image, especially if that image has been printed rather than sitting on hard drive in some proprietary format that no software can open anymore. Print your work! That said, here is part of the story on how I left Nikon for Fujifilm 3 1/2 years ago. (A much longer version is buried deep in my blog if you are curious).  […]

    Reply

  7. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | My Wedding photogr...
    April 28, 2016 @ 2:06 pm

    […] A BRIEF PREFACE: I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook …  […]

    Reply

  8. Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Fuji-X Photography...
    April 29, 2016 @ 3:18 am

    […] A BRIEF PREFACE: I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook …  […]

    Reply

  9. Mark
    August 31, 2016 @ 6:42 pm

    It’s hard to tell what blog posts are paid for Fuji and which are genuinely the result of user experience. So to confirm, are you receiving anything from Fuji? You mention that you have been shooting Fuji since 2012 and it’s now 2016 so I wonder why you are posting this now….four years later?

    I have been using Nikon since the late 90s. I have had several Nikon DSLR bodies as well as an Olympus 4:3 camera and a variety of point and shoots from Sony to Canon. I bought into the Fuji Koolaid last year after reading “blogs” around the internet that convinced me I should try out an X100T. It sounded perfect! A small bodied camera with a fixed lens. Perfect. It was the biggest mistake I ever made and I sold the camera on Craigslist last week. I picked up my old D90 (it was the last Nikon I had after selling all my gear like a lot of people) and I was blown away that it actually has more pleasing images than the X100T. No, it does not have the same High ISO performance however it also has controls in the right places, a menu that isn’t fidgety, a battery that lasts days (not hours like the X100T) and it also has a very good factory RAW program (unlike Fuji with their idiotic Silkypix derived “RAW EX Converter).

    I’m not trying to rant, but I just find Fujis approach at promotion disingenuous.

    Reply

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